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 The Roman Catholic Church teaches the doctrine of Indulgences. An indulgence is a means of remission of the temporal punishment for sins which have already been forgiven but are due to the Christian in this life and/or in purgatory. It removes time needed to be spent in purgatory.

o Catechism 1471: “An indulgence is a remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven, which the faithful Christian who is duly disposed gains under certain prescribed conditions through the action of the Church which, as a minister of redemption, dispenses and applies with authority the treasury of the satisfaction of Christ and the saints.” “An indulgence is partial or plenary according as it removes either part or all of the temporal punishment due to sin. The faithful can gain indulgences for themselves or apply them to the dead.”

o Catechism 1478: “An indulgence is obtained through the Church who, by virtue of the power of binding and loosing granted her by Christ Jesus, intervenes in favor of individual Christians and opens for them the treasury of merits of Christ and the saints to obtain from the Father of mercies the remission of the temporal punishments due for their sins. Thus the Church does not want to simply come to the aid of these Christians, but also to spur them to works of devotion, penance, and charity.”

o Catechism 1498: “the indulgences the faithful can obtain the remission of temporal punishment resulting from sin for themselves and also of the souls in Purgatory.”

o Catechism 1472: “To understand this doctrine and practice of the Church, it is necessary to understand that sin has a double consequence. Grave sin deprives us of communion with God and therefore makes us incapable of eternal life, the privation of which is called the ‘eternal punishment’of sin. On the other hand, every sin, even venial, entails an unhealthy attachment to creatures, which must be purified either here on earth, or after death in the state called Purgatory. This purification frees one from what is called the ‘temporal punishment’ of sin. These two punishments must not be conceived of as a kind of vengeance inflicted by God from without, but as following from the very nature of sin. A conversion which proceeds from a fervent charity can attain the complete purification of the sinner in such a way that no punishment would remain.”

 Among other indulgences, Pope Francis offered “time off purgatory” to followers of his tweets.

 The obvious problem with indulgences is that they negate all — sufficiency of the cross.