Salt’s History: from Great Wealth to Dirt Cheap

It’s historically linked to industry, political power, and war. It’s been a source of great wealth and one of the most desired substances in human history. Yet today, it’s plentiful and dirt cheap. What is it? It is, of course, salt. Early humans soon learned that their bodies needed salt to stay alive. Nobody knows if ancient hunters salted their mastodon meat since red meat already contains plenty of salt. But after the Ice Age,…

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Salty Taste: You, Science, Superstitions and Miscellaneous

SALT BECOMES Y O U Salt is life itself: We each have about eight ounces of salt inside us. It’s vital for regulating muscle contraction, heartbeat, nerve impulse transmission, protein digestion and the exchange of water between cells, so as to bring food in and waste out. Deprived of salt, the body goes into convulsion, paralysis, and death. Hypertension and salt: Baby food makers have learned they can sell more if they salt it. Why?…

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How Valuable Is the Salt?

* 40 million tons are required each year to fill our needs. * Homer called it divine. * Plato called it a “substance dear to the gods.” * Shakespeare mentioned salt 17 times in his plays. * Perhaps Leonard da Vinci wanted to send a subtle message about purity lost when he painted “The Last Supper”; in that painting, an overturned salt cellar is conspicuously placed before Judas. * In ancient Greece, a far-flung trade…

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How to Grow the Church's Online Reach

The Value of Salt in America

In Manistee, Michigan I would walk my dogs around the buildings of Morton Salt. You see, one company in that town pumped chemicals out of the ground that were in a liquid sludge. They were after the mineral Magnesium. However, that sludge was also very heavy with salt. Instead of throwing the salt away, Morton built a plant and extracted the throwaway stuff which ends up on your dining table and mine. When we flew…

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Salt Thoughts: Fun Facts About Salt

Until recently, salt bars were the standard currency of Ethiopia. In ancient Greece, slaves were traded for salt, hence the expression “not worth his salt”. In his painting The Last Supper, Leonardo da Vinci put an overturned salt cellar in front of the ill-fated Judas. In old Japanese theatres, salt was sprinkled on the stage before performances to prevent evil spirits from casting a spell on the actors and ruining the play. In Arab countries,…

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  • Psalm 121:7-8 June 22, 2021
    “The LORD will keep you from all harm— he will watch over your life; the LORD will watch over your coming and going both now and forevermore.”
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